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Coordinating Conjunctions | Award Winning Coordinating Conjunctions Teaching Video | FANBOYS


Introducing Coordinating Conjunctions at
GrammarSongs by Melissa. You have learned about many parts of speech in
the English language and how they all work together when you read, speak, or
write. so what is a conjunction? More importantly, how can using conjunctions
make me a better speaker or writer? Let’s get started!
A conjunction is a part of speech that connects two words, phrases, or clauses.
Conjunctions? Phrases? Clauses? Okay, one step at a time. There are several
different types of conjunctions. Wow! Yikes!
This video will focus on coordinating conjunctions. There are seven
conjunctions classified as coordinating conjunctions in the English language.
They are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. People often use the mnemonic device
“fanboys” to help remember them easily. To put it simply, coordinating conjunctions
are used to join two ideas, but each one is used a little differently.
The conjunction “for” is used to show a reason or cause. She was tired, for the
baby kept her up all night. The baby keeping her up all night was the reason
she was tired. The conjunction “and” combines things. I can wash the dishes
and you can dry them. The two ideas are joined into one sentence. The conjunction “nor” combines negative
ideas. Abbey doesn’t like corn, nor does she like peas. She likes neither
vegetable. The conjunction “but” expresses an exception or contrast. Most of my
friends have dogs, but Ann has a cat. Ann is the exception.
The conjunction “or” offers choices. We could go to the park,
or we could play outside. Which choice sounds best? “Yet” is similar to “but.” Yet is
used for unexpected things or surprising contrasts. Puppies are cute, yet they are
a big responsibility! “Yet” offers a positive and a negative, or a negative
and then positive. “So” is a coordinating conjunction that provides consequences.
Seymour didn’t study, so he didn’t pass his test. Using “so” is similar to using
“for.” The fact that he didn’t pass his test is a direct consequence of not
studying. Now that you know more about coordinating conjunctions, it is
important to understand how they can benefit you as a speaker or writer.
Coordinating conjunctions can be used to join words….. ladies and gentlemen……
chocolate or vanilla. Coordinating conjunctions can be used to connect
phrases or groups of words…. The ball went down the slide and over the fence. Most
importantly, coordinating conjunctions combine complete sentences to make
speaking and writing more fluent and less choppy. Tuck’s car wouldn’t start, so he
had to ride the bus. So remember that a conjunction is a part
of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses. There are several types of
conjunctions in the English language. There are seven conjunctions that are
classified as coordinating conjunctions. They are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.
People often use the mnemonic device “fanboys” to remember them easily.
Each coordinating conjunction is a little different, but they all connect
words, phrases, and sentences to make speaking and writing more fluent and
less choppy. Hooray! You did a great job learning about coordinating conjunctions.
Thank you for joining me at Grammar Songs by Melissa. Click on a video to
learn more about coordinating conjunctions or other parts of speech.

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