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Coordinating Conjunctions More | Award Winning Coordinating Conjunctions Teaching Video | FANBOYS


Using Coordinating Conjunctions at
GrammarSongs by Melissa. You have learned about many parts of speech in
the English language and how they all work together when you read, speak, and
write. You have also learned that a complete sentence is made up of a
subject and a predicate. The subject tells who or what the sentence is about, and
the predicate tells what the subject does or is. In the sentence,
“The old lady
baked some cookies,”
“the old lady” is the subject because she is who the sentence
is about. “Baked some cookies,”
is the predicate because it tells what the old
lady, the subject, did. You have also learned that a conjunction is a part of
speech that connects or joins two words, phrases, or clauses. The prefix “con” means
“with” or “together.” The word “junction’ is a noun that means “a point where two or
more things are joined,” so the name “conjunction” makes a lot of sense. I never
knew that! Me neither! There are different types of
conjunctions in the English language, but this video will focus only on
coordinating conjunctions. Thank goodness! There are seven conjunctions classified
as coordinating conjunctions. They are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so.People
often use the mnemonic device”fanboys” to remember them easily. Fanboys! That’s cool!
Memorizing the coordinating conjunctions is easy, but just knowing them won’t help
if you don’t know how to use them when you speak or when you write. Remember, a
coordinating conjunction is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or
clauses. Words like “boy or girl!” Phrases like “over the river and through
the woods.” But, what are clauses? Don’t worry!
You already know more than you might think. You already know that a complete
sentence is made up of a subject and a predicate. Yes! So? Well a complete
sentence is the same thing as an independent clause. Independent clause?
Yes, it sounds fancy, but don’t let it scare you! Coordinating conjunctions can
be used to join two independent clauses or complete sentences. Let me show you.
Let’s say I have two complete sentences….. Luke likes to write. Stanley likes to
read. I can choose a coordinating conjunction
to join the two sentences or independent clauses to make one sentence.
Coordinating conjunctions are like glue. They combine two ideas. The coordinating
conjunction glues the two sentences or independent clauses together/ I could
choose the coordinating conjunction “and” to combine information about Luke and
Stanley, creating a longer compound sentence that sounds less choppy. Luke
likes to write, and Stanley likes to read. I could choose the coordinating
conjunction “but” to contrast or tell the difference between Luke and Stanley. Luke
likes to write, but Stanley likes to read. Notice a comma takes the place of the
period in my first sentence. A comma always comes before the conjunction when
we combine independent clauses. So you just glued the two sentences together?
That was easy! Let’s practice again! Okay, let’s practice
again! Let’s use coordinating conjunctions to combine two independent
clauses or complete sentences.. Don’t forget the glue! Oh, thanks!
Anne was hungry. She made a sandwich. I could use the coordinating conjunction
“and” to combine information about Anne, creating a longer compound sentence that
sounds less choppy. Anne was hungry, and she made a sandwich. An even better
choice would be to use the coordinating conjunction “so” which describes a reason
or consequence. Anne was hungry, so she made a sandwich.
The reason Anne made the sandwich is because she was hungry. Notice, the comma
comes before the conjunction. That was yummy! Let’s practice using coordinating
conjunctions to combine independent clauses one more time.
Here’s the glue! Okay, thanks! We can go to the movies. We can go to the zoo. I can
use the coordinating conjunction “or” to combine these two independent clauses to
form one compound sentence. We can go to the movies, or we can go to the zoo. “Or” is
a coordinating conjunction that offers choices. If we were going to have a very
busy day, I could choose “and” to do both activities. We can go to the movies, and
we can go to the zoo. Notice the comma comes before the coordinating
conjunction in our new compound sentence. Let’s go to the zoo!
Hooray! Enjoy your time at the zoo. You did a great job learning to use coordinating
conjunctions. Thank you for joining me at GrammarSongs by Melissa.
Enjoy other related videos at Grammar Songs.com

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